Your meter measures the amount of gas or electricity that you use. The readings taken from your meter are used to calculate the bills you receive from your energy supplier.

Who Reads Your Meter?

ESB Networks (ESBN) are responsible for installing and maintaining your electricity meter and Gas Networks Ireland (GNI) have the same role in relation to your gas meter.

Both ESBN and GNI will try to read your meter four times per year. For the other two billing periods they will create estimated reads. These meter readings are passed on to your supplier, who will use the reads to calculate how much energy you have used and to issue a bill for the usage.

When the meter reader visits your property to read the meter, they may not be able to access it to take a reading. This happens if gates are locked, if there is something blocking the meter or if the meter is inside and you are not at home to let them in. When the meter reader cannot get access to the meter they will leave a card in the mailbox to let you know that they were there and to tell you how you can submit your own read. If you do not submit a meter reading, then an estimated read will be used.

It will be clearly marked on your bill whether the read used was an actual read, an estimated read or a read supplied by the customer. The markings used are as follows:

A - means an actual meter read by ESBN or GNI

C – means a read submitted by the customer.

E – means your bill has been calculated using an estimated meter reading.

Estimated Bills?

As set out above, bills based on estimates will occur when there is a planned estimate or when the meter reader could not get access to read the meter.

Sometimes if there are a number of estimated bills in a row, the estimated readings might not reflect the real reading. This can result in a large bill for customers when an actual read is taken. So it is very important to check your bills to make sure you are not always getting estimated bills.

If you receive a bill which has been estimated, you should check your meter to see if there is a significant difference between the estimate and what is shown by the meter.  If there is a difference you can submit your own meter read and there is information below about how to do this.

By submitting your own read, you can be sure you are being billed accurately and that there are no surprise “catch-up” bills.

Reading Your Electricity Meter

ESB Networks (ESBN) will try to read your electricity meter four times per year, but you can read your own meter at any time and by submitting your own reads it will help to ensure that you get accurate bills.

The best place to find information about reading you meter is on the ESB Networks website. They have very useful information on the different types of meters customers have as well as providing useful videos on how to read your meter. We have outlined the key information below, but you can also find any information you will need on the How to Read My Meter page on the ESB Networks website.

What type of electricity meter do I have?

There are three main types of electricity meters in use and below is some information on each

Mechanical Meter

This meter is the most common type of meter in domestic dwellings. It has a revolving disc and one row of numbers. There are two different types – 24 Hr Revolving Disc Meter and Time of Day Meter.

For more information on each type of meter, click on either of the buttons below:

           

Business customers may have a Wattless Meter installed. The Wattless meter is distinguished from Standard Meters or Day & Night Meters by the letters kVArh located near its register and is read in the same way.

Electronic Meter

               

Pay As You Go Meter

Your electricity supplier may arrange for a Pay as You Go meter to be installed at your premises. Each Pay as You Go meter has two elements, a customer keypad and an ESB Networks main meter.

It is important to note that even if you have a Pay as You Go meter, a meter reader will still call to read the main meter.

There is detailed information from ESBN on PAYG meters, which you can find by clicking on either of the buttons below:

               

Budget Controllers

Pay as You Go meters are installed and operated by ESB Networks. However, some suppliers now offer customers the opportunity to install a budget controller (which is sometimes called a prepay meter), which works in a similar way to the Pay as You Go meter.

The budget controller is installed and operated by the supplier and customers must top up to ensure that electricity continues to flow.

All electricity customers with a supplier installed budget controller still keep their ESBN meter. The ESBN meter is the meter of record. This means that if there is any dispute, the ESBN meter is the one used to calculate your usage. Your supplier has a responsibility to ensure that any difference between the ESBN meter and the budget controller is identified early and highlighted to you.

If you have a budget controller installed and you would like to find out more information about how to use or read it, then you should contact your supplier directly.

How to Submit An Electricity Meter Read

You can submit a meter read to ESB Networks or to your supplier.

If you wish to submit your reading to ESB Networks all you need is your Meter Point Reference Number (MPRN) and your meter reading. There are a number of ways, which are listed below:

If you wish to submit your reading to your supplier all you need is your Meter Point Reference Number (MPRN) and your meter reading. Supplier also have a number of ways to submit a reading. You can contact them directly to find the most suitable option for you and there are contact details of all supplier available on our List of Energy Suppliers page.

How To Find Your MPRN

Your Meter Point Reference Number (MPRN) is the unique 11 digit number assigned to your electricity connection and meter.  It starts with the digits 10 and is always shown on the bill from your electricity supplier. For a short video on how to locate your MPRN, visit the How to Find Your MPRN page on the ESB Networks website.

Reading Your Gas Meter

Gas Networks Ireland (GNI) will try to read your gas meter four times per year but you can read your own meter at any time. By submitting your own reads it will help to ensure that you get accurate bills.

The best place to find information about reading your meter is on the GNI website. They have very useful information on the different types of meters customers have. We have outlined the key information below, but you can visit the Submit a Meter Reading page on the GNI website.

What type of gas meter do I have?

There are two main types of gas meters in use and below is some information on each.

Digital Meter

If you have a digital meter where you can directly read the numbers (digits) like the diagram below, read the figures as shown from left to right, ignoring the numbers to the right of the comma (or in some meters ignore the numbers in the red box).

Dial (Clock) Meter

If you have a dial (clock) meter it will display a series of dials, like the diagram below. The four small dials at the bottom should be read from left to right.

  • The position of the pointer on the dial indicates what the reading should be.
  • If the pointer is between two figures, use the lower figure, for example if it is between 7 and 8, use 7. However, if the pointer is between 9 and 0, use 9.

How to Submit A Gas Meter Read

You can submit a gas meter read to Gas Networks Ireland or to your supplier.

If you wish to submit your reading to Gas Networks Ireland all you need is your Gas Point Registration Number (GPRN) and your meter reading. There are a couple of ways, which are listed below:

If you wish to submit your reading to your supplier all you need is your Gas Point Registration Number (GPRN) and your meter reading. Supplier also have a number of ways to submit a reading. You can contact them directly to find the most suitable option for you and there are contact details of all suppliers available on our List of Energy Suppliers page.

How To Find Your GPRN

Every gas point in the country has a unique identification number known as a Gas Point Registration Number (GPRN). Your GPRN can be found on your gas bill, usually it is located in the top right hand corner of your bill.

Contact Us

We are here to help you, so if you have questions about any of the items mentioned on this page, please feel free to contact the CRU’s Customer Care Team.

To see the different ways to contact us, to find out how, visit the Customer Care Team page.